Young people were a regular part of the political vanguard until the late 1980s, when activism was perceived to be threatening stability and undermining market reforms. Photo: AFP
Josef Gregory Mahoney
Opinion

Opinion

Josef Gregory Mahoney

A century on from the May Fourth protests, Chinese youths are in a state of crisis

  • China’s young people, once at the forefront of politics, are increasingly disenfranchised, and part of a worrying generational gap as a result of the nation’s unprecedented cultural and economic development

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Young people were a regular part of the political vanguard until the late 1980s, when activism was perceived to be threatening stability and undermining market reforms. Photo: AFP
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Josef Gregory Mahoney

Josef Gregory Mahoney

Josef Gregory Mahoney is professor of politics at East China Normal University in Shanghai, where he also directs the International Centre for Advanced Political Studies and the international graduate programme in politics. He was previously with the Central Compilation and Translation Bureau in Beijing, then China’s leading think tank.