Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP
Roland Rajah
Opinion

Opinion

Roland Rajah

Why US-China talks should focus on technology as the greater threat, instead of trade

  • A trade deal is unlikely to achieve US hawks’ objectives and might even make American companies in China more beholden to the Communist Party’s influence
  • Balancing market openness on technology with national security threats is the policy challenge of our time

Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He (right) gestures as US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (centre) chats with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer before their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on May 1. President Donald Trump has turned up the pressure on China, threatening to hike tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE
Roland Rajah

Roland Rajah

Roland Rajah is director of the International Economy Programme at the Lowy Institute