Zhou Qiang, chief justice and president of the Supreme People’s Court of China, presents his work report to the 13th National People’s Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 12, 2019. Photo: Simon Song
Y.L. Cheung
Opinion

Opinion

Y.L. Cheung

China’s rule of law has not improved enough to reassure Hongkongers on the risks of extradition to the mainland

  • From the suspension of an outspoken law professor to the detention of human rights lawyers and a confession-driven investigation and prosecution system, the rule of law in China has a long way to go before it meets the best international standards

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Zhou Qiang, chief justice and president of the Supreme People’s Court of China, presents his work report to the 13th National People’s Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 12, 2019. Photo: Simon Song
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Opponents to the proposed extradition bill rally outside the Legislative Council building, where the amendments were to be discussed, on May 4. Photo: Edmond So
Grenville Cross
Opinion

Opinion

Grenville Cross

Opponents to Hong Kong’s extradition bill are blind to progress in China’s legal system

  • The legal amendments will enable an arrangement for fugitive transfer with the mainland not unlike those it already has in place with other countries
  • Critics fail to see the improvements over the years to China’s judicial processes

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Opponents to the proposed extradition bill rally outside the Legislative Council building, where the amendments were to be discussed, on May 4. Photo: Edmond So
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