A shareholder at a stock brokerage in Beijing, China, on May 6. Equities may not get much love in this environment, but there are some positive long-term stories to consider. Photo: Simon Song
Tai Hui
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Tai Hui

Businesses shiver in the uncertain climate as US-China trade war tensions are renewed

  • It looks like a return to the downbeat days of 2018, except this time around, central banks’ willingness to keep monetary policy loose could signal hope for investors

TOP PICKS

A shareholder at a stock brokerage in Beijing, China, on May 6. Equities may not get much love in this environment, but there are some positive long-term stories to consider. Photo: Simon Song
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Yi Gang, governor of the People’s Bank of China, arrives for the European Union-China high-level economic dialogue at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, on June 25, 2018. With its centrally planned economy, China could ensure closer integration between monetary policy and government objectives. Photo: Reuters
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Should central banks be revamping their monetary policy frameworks and liaising more with governments?

  • With the trade war threatening already slowing global growth, it could be time for central banks to synchronise their efforts more closely with government fiscal goals
  • While crossing the line separating government and central banks might be harder in advanced economies, China may be better placed to do so

TOP PICKS

Yi Gang, governor of the People’s Bank of China, arrives for the European Union-China high-level economic dialogue at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, on June 25, 2018. With its centrally planned economy, China could ensure closer integration between monetary policy and government objectives. Photo: Reuters
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