China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE
China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE
Daniel Wagner
Opinion

Opinion

Daniel Wagner

In an era of disruption, China is positioning itself as the next foreign policy leader

  • As the world’s governments grapple with uncertainties, China, with its belt and road strategy, growing military muscle and AI ambitions, is preparing to emerge as a leading force in diplomacy

China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE
China is prepared for the global turbulence with its decades-long use of five-year plans, the latest of which was made in 2017, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, seen here on October 18, with security officers standing guard before the opening ceremony of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Daniel Wagner

Daniel Wagner

Daniel Wagner is senior investment officer for guarantees and syndications at the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing. He has three decades of experience assessing cross-border risk, is an authority on political risk insurance and analysis, and has worked for some of the world’s most respected and best-known companies, such as AIG, GE, the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the World Bank Group. He has published eight books as well as more than 700 articles on current affairs and risk management. He holds master’s degrees in International Relations from the University of Chicago and in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management.