Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock
Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock
Paul Yip
Opinion

Opinion

Paul Yip

China and Hong Kong’s ‘996’ work culture is bad for employees’ mental health, and ultimately bad for employers

  • Studies show that overwork can have a number of harmful effects on employees that will be reflected in the quality of their work, and that more flexible hours have benefits

Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock
Employers who expect their workers to put in excessive hours can count on less efficiency, lost hours due to health problems and, over the long term, more employee turnover. Photo: Shutterstock
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Paul Yip

Paul Yip

Paul Yip is the founding director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, and a professor at the university's Department of Social Work and Social Administration. His interests include suicide prevention, population health and poverty research. He serves as the secretary general of the Asian Population Association and the research chair of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. He was a part-time member of the Central Policy Unit and a member of the Hong Kong government's Steering Committee on Population Policy.