A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP
A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP
Philip Bowring
Opinion

Opinion

Philip Bowring

A slow death for Hong Kong’s separate identity in China

  • Philip Bowring says the city’s cherished freedoms and rule of law are under serious threat, amid pressure – now exacerbated by intense US-China confrontation – for it to integrate with the mainland and demonstrate loyalty to Beijing

A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP
A section of the newly-opened Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, the world’s longest sea bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China. Hongkongers are being urged to see themselves as part of the Greater Bay Area, a Chinese government plan to link cities in southern China. Photo: AFP
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Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring has been based in Asia for 39 years writing on regional financial and political issues. He has been a columnist for the South China Morning Post since the mid-1990s and for the International Herald Tribune from 1992 to 2011. He also contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, www.asiasentinel.com, a website of which he is a founder, and elsewhere. Prior to 1992 he was with the weekly Far Eastern Economic Review, latterly as editor.