Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan
Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan
Alice Wu
Opinion

Opinion

Alice Wu

Hong Kong isn’t dead (yet), but it has lost its edge

  • Alice Wu says Hongkongers lost their way after the handover, becoming complacent even as the rise of mainland China chipped away at Hong Kong’s confidence

Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan
Hong Kong then and now. On the right, the handover ceremony in 1997. On the left, a 2016 protest about the National People Congress’ interpretation of the Basic Law. Hongkongers used to be politically apathetic and clear-headed, but have they lost their way after 1997? Photos: K.Y. Cheng, Martin Chan
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Alice Wu

Alice Wu

Alice Wu fell down the rabbit hole of politics aged 12, when she ran her first election campaign. She has been writing about local politics and current affairs for the Post since 2008. Alice's daily needs include her journals, books, a multi-coloured pen and several lattes.