A young man helps an elderly woman push a trolley of cardboard sheets she collected for recycling during a rainy day in Hong Kong, in May 2017. A larger proportion of Hong Kong’s elderly than its working-age population live in public housing, a fact not reflected in the city’s poverty line calculations. Photo: Sam Tsang
Richard Wong
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Richard Wong

How Hong Kong’s poverty line is skewed by the elderly, to the detriment of its working-age population

  • Richard Wong says removing the elderly from the calculation of the poverty line would better reflect poverty among those of working age
  • This would allow for more targeted poverty alleviation measures for both groups, one based on consumption expenditure and the other on income

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A young man helps an elderly woman push a trolley of cardboard sheets she collected for recycling during a rainy day in Hong Kong, in May 2017. A larger proportion of Hong Kong’s elderly than its working-age population live in public housing, a fact not reflected in the city’s poverty line calculations. Photo: Sam Tsang
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