Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee
Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee
Anson Au
Opinion

Opinion

Anson Au

Stress facing Hong Kong teachers and students is a collective problem we cannot ignore

  • Anson Au says though stress is often dismissed as an individual problem, studies on its characteristics show it is a huge public health danger. Stress builds up silently, induces destructive emotions and behaviour, and can even change genes

Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee
Participants of a rally last year in Hong Kong on September 18, World Suicide Prevention Day, call for more measures to help those vulnerable to suicide. Photo: Dickson Lee
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Anson Au

Anson Au

Anson Au is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Toronto. Award-winning author of over 30 academic research articles, he is an expert in professions, organisations, and social and economic networks, particularly in East Asia. He has previously held visiting appointments at the National Sun Yat-Sen University in Taiwan, Seoul National University and Yonsei University in South Korea, Harbin Institute of Technology in China, and University of Malaya in Malaysia.