While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters
While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters
Daniel Poon
Opinion

Opinion

Daniel Poon

China broke the rules of global trade – but for good reason

Daniel Poon says the global trade regime that now exists has become an example of institutional overreach: backed by its developed-country members, the WTO has effectively reduced the policy space of developing countries to become rich themselves

While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters
While many people have debated the rights and wrongs of Chinese trade policies, there has been little open contemplation of why China adopted such practices in the first place. Photo: Reuters
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Daniel Poon

Daniel Poon

Daniel Poon is an economist with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Division on Globalisation and Development Strategies. He has worked for the International Labour Organisation and the North-South Institute, and was previously a visiting scholar with the Institute of World Economy and Politics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing. His main publications and research interests involve China’s industrial strategy, development finance, and South-South economic relations.