Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS
Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS
Richard Wong
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Richard Wong

What Apple and Airbnb have in common – intangible assets that power their profit margins

Richard Wong says ideas and innovation have become a new form of capital that cannot be seen but whose scalability enables companies to increase their bottom lines

Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS
Tim Cook introduces Apple’s new smartphone, the iPhone Xs, on September 12, at the company headquarters in Cupertino, California. The world’s most valuable company, Apple owns virtually no tangible assets. Photo: Bay Area News Group/TNS
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Richard Wong

Richard Wong

Richard Wong Yue-chim is the Philip Wong Kennedy Wong Professor in Political Economy at the University of Hong Kong