People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua
People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Will the Year of the Pig rein in Chinese yuan bulls as the seasonal boost ends and trade war reality kicks in?

  • Neal Kimberley says despite the Chinese currency’s strong start in January, the uncertainty over US-China trade negotiations and the possibility that Chinese exporters were behind seasonal demand for the yuan should give investors pause

People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua
People shop for Lunar New Year decorations at a market in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Chinese exporters may have converted overseas revenues into yuan in time for the festival, which could be behind the spike in the US dollar-yuan exchange rate. Photo: Xinhua
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.