Benjamin Au Yeung Wai-hoo, aka “Ben Sir”, a former senior lecturer in Chinese at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, poses with a banner saying “Cantonese won’t die”. Au quit his job for his mission to revitalise the indigenous culture of Hong Kong, Guangdong province and other parts of southern China through star power. Photo: Sam Tsang
Benjamin Au Yeung Wai-hoo, aka “Ben Sir”, a former senior lecturer in Chinese at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, poses with a banner saying “Cantonese won’t die”. Au quit his job for his mission to revitalise the indigenous culture of Hong Kong, Guangdong province and other parts of southern China through star power. Photo: Sam Tsang
Cantonese

Letters | Cantonese can survive the march of Mandarin, but only as a mother tongue

  • Since Mandarin is the national language, there is little incentive for anyone to learn Cantonese as a second

Topic |   Cantonese
Benjamin Au Yeung Wai-hoo, aka “Ben Sir”, a former senior lecturer in Chinese at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, poses with a banner saying “Cantonese won’t die”. Au quit his job for his mission to revitalise the indigenous culture of Hong Kong, Guangdong province and other parts of southern China through star power. Photo: Sam Tsang
Benjamin Au Yeung Wai-hoo, aka “Ben Sir”, a former senior lecturer in Chinese at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, poses with a banner saying “Cantonese won’t die”. Au quit his job for his mission to revitalise the indigenous culture of Hong Kong, Guangdong province and other parts of southern China through star power. Photo: Sam Tsang
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