A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP
A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP

Letters | Coronavirus pandemic: why ban on wildlife for food is not the answer

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic: All stories
A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP
A policeman watches over a civet cat captured in the wild by a farmer in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, in May 2003. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic was linked to the civet cat. Photo: AFP
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