A view of the Hong Kong Golf Club in Fanling. The debate over converting a golf course into housing is an example of how the status divide between haves and have-nots has been politicised. Photo: Yik Yeung-man
A view of the Hong Kong Golf Club in Fanling. The debate over converting a golf course into housing is an example of how the status divide between haves and have-nots has been politicised. Photo: Yik Yeung-man
Hong Kong

Letters | To retain talent, Hong Kong can start by not resenting the success of talented people

  • Although housing remains the city’s biggest problem, there are ways to resolve the issue without demonising the business elite, destroying sporting clubs and worsening social division

A view of the Hong Kong Golf Club in Fanling. The debate over converting a golf course into housing is an example of how the status divide between haves and have-nots has been politicised. Photo: Yik Yeung-man
A view of the Hong Kong Golf Club in Fanling. The debate over converting a golf course into housing is an example of how the status divide between haves and have-nots has been politicised. Photo: Yik Yeung-man
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