The Federal Reserve Board, whose building is seen here on Constitution Avenue in Washington, suggested that the unprecedented wave of quantitative easing undertaken by central banks around the world may have contributed to the flatter yield curve for Treasury bills. Photo: Reuters
Hannah Anderson
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Hannah Anderson

The bond market flashes a ‘recession warning’, but it’s not time yet to panic

  • An inverted yield curve typically precedes a worsening economic outlook, even a recession. But this time, as yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped below that on the three-month bills, many other factors were at play. There’s no guarantee a recession will follow

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The Federal Reserve Board, whose building is seen here on Constitution Avenue in Washington, suggested that the unprecedented wave of quantitative easing undertaken by central banks around the world may have contributed to the flatter yield curve for Treasury bills. Photo: Reuters
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The change started at the ballot box, such as this one in Australia. Photo: AFP
Richard Harris
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Richard Harris

Political change is in the air, from Europe to India and Australia, and markets should take heed

  • Recent elections around the world have mostly produced surprises and attacks on the status quo. The ripple of change will have an effect on the overstretched market, so we should expect bloated prices to fall

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The change started at the ballot box, such as this one in Australia. Photo: AFP
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