Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP
Kevin Rafferty
Opinion

Opinion

Kevin Rafferty

Will Modi unleash India’s economic potential or destroy its future with sectarian strife?

  • There are hopes that Modi will create much-needed jobs and propel economic growth but also fears that he will inflame religious differences and worsen ties with nuclear-armed neighbour Pakistan

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers during the Hindu Kumbh festival in February. Modi, a masterful political performer, won a landslide victory at the recent general elections. Photo: AP
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Kevin Rafferty

Kevin Rafferty

Kevin Rafferty, a journalist for 50 years, started writing about cricket and football for The Observer when at Oxford University. He joined the foreign staff of the Financial Times, was in charge of the FT’s Asian coverage, and opened the paper’s first Hong Kong office. He has lived and worked in Delhi, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Osaka, and Washington, and edited daily papers in 30 major cities during IMF and multilateral development bank meetings. He was professor in the Institute for Academic Initiatives at Osaka University.