An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters
An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters
Natalie Bridgeman Fields
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Natalie Bridgeman Fields

China’s promise of responsible belt and road investments is in the hands of its bankers

  • All along the belt and road, from Myanmar to Peru, ignoring community feedback is costing Chinese investors dearly. China’s banks and financial institutions need to quickly adopt an accountability framework for Chinese investments abroad

An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters
An environmental activist in costume during a protest against the Chinese-financed coal plant project in Kenya, outside parliament house in Nairobi last year. The project has stalled due to the storm of unhappiness locally. Photo: Reuters
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Natalie Bridgeman Fields

Natalie Bridgeman Fields

Natalie Bridgeman Fields is the founder and executive director of Accountability Counsel. She leads the nonprofit organisation of community-driven lawyers, policy advocates and researchers working to ensure that communities can take part in global decisions impacting their livelihoods and environment. Previously, she served as a consultant on accountability for two development banks. Natalie has been recognized for her social entrepreneurship as an Echoing Green Fellow, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation Entrepreneur, and Stanford University CDDRL Fellow.