Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong
Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong
Philip Bowring
Opinion

Opinion

Philip Bowring

Like Aung San Suu Kyi, Carrie Lam has let her one weakness overpower her better qualities

  • The Hong Kong chief executive, who has stressed her Catholic faith and has a long record of being an honest civil servant, has betrayed the expectations of Hongkongers by doing the bidding of Beijing

Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong
Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media and urges schools, businesses and unions to think twice before going on strike in protest against the extradition bill legislation at the Chief Executive’s office in Tamar, Admiralty, on June 11. Photo: Winson Wong
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Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring has been based in Asia for 39 years writing on regional financial and political issues. He has been a columnist for the South China Morning Post since the mid-1990s and for the International Herald Tribune from 1992 to 2011. He also contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, www.asiasentinel.com, a website of which he is a founder, and elsewhere. Prior to 1992 he was with the weekly Far Eastern Economic Review, latterly as editor.