The US flag flies at the Port of Los Angeles on June 18. The US-China tussle over trade is nothing new. The 1844 Treaty of Wanghia was fundamentally about trade. Its primary accomplishment was to end China’s tariff autonomy, by fixing ad valorem import and export duties at 5 per cent, levelling the playing field in favour of American and British merchants. Photo: AFP
Eric Stryson
Opinion

Opinion

Eric Stryson

Hong Kong’s fear over the extradition law is neither unique nor new. Remember the Treaty of Wanghia

  • Hongkongers’ fight against a proposed law that would open the door to politically motivated exploitation should be understood in the wider context of history
  • The first China-US diplomatic treaty signed 175 years ago offers lessons on extraterritorial law enforcement and the Chinese imperative for sovereignty

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The US flag flies at the Port of Los Angeles on June 18. The US-China tussle over trade is nothing new. The 1844 Treaty of Wanghia was fundamentally about trade. Its primary accomplishment was to end China’s tariff autonomy, by fixing ad valorem import and export duties at 5 per cent, levelling the playing field in favour of American and British merchants. Photo: AFP
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