A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego
A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego
Patima Tungpuchayakul
Opinion

Opinion

Patima Tungpuchayakul

Slavery on the high seas: how Southeast Asia can end forced labour on fishing boats

  • Slave labour renders business models in the Southeast Asian seafood sector not only unsustainable but dangerous
  • An industry-wide no-slavery policy, greater business accountability and better rehabilitation of rescued workers show the way forward

A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego
A Myanmese migrant cleans a fishing vessel in the port of Mahachai, one of the main hubs of the Thai fishing industry, a sector that has been linked to human trafficking and slave-like conditions. Photo: Laura Villadiego
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Patima Tungpuchayakul

Patima Tungpuchayakul

Patima Tungpuchayakul is co-founder of the Labour Protection Network, a Thai-based NGO which works to rescue and rehabilitate slave labourers in the fishing sector. She was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017.