Photographers record a protest outside the British consulate in Hong Kong. Journalists have been working long hours covering the unrest in the city. Photo: Rachel Cheung
Rachel Cheung
Opinion

Opinion

Rachel Cheung

Hong Kong protests take toll on mental health of journalists, but we find a way to keep going

  • Protesters, law enforcers and Hong Kong residents alike are suffering amid the unrest; it has also affected journalists covering events on the front line
  • Long hours, flashbacks, insomnia – no wonder some seek counselling. Rachel Cheung recalls a moment of quiet connection that gave her the strength to go on

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Photographers record a protest outside the British consulate in Hong Kong. Journalists have been working long hours covering the unrest in the city. Photo: Rachel Cheung
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People sing Glory to Hong Kong in a shopping mall in the city earlier this month. Crowds have gathered in several malls to sing the song, which has become the anthem of anti-government protests that have rocked Hong Kong since June. Photo: AP

Hong Kong protest anthem Glory to Hong Kong takes on a life of its own, translated and performed in sign language

  • It’s become the song of Hong Kong’s summer of protest, and a producer working with its composer says the reason is simple: its martial beat
  • Several versions have been posted online, the latest for deaf supporters, and it has been sung in shopping malls. It strengthens protest spirit, producer says
Topic |   Hong Kong protests

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People sing Glory to Hong Kong in a shopping mall in the city earlier this month. Crowds have gathered in several malls to sing the song, which has become the anthem of anti-government protests that have rocked Hong Kong since June. Photo: AP
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