British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (right) and leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn prepare to lay wreaths during the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph in Whitehall in London on November 10. Photo: AP
Philip Bowring
Opinion

Opinion

Philip Bowring

Brexit-beset Britain and Modi’s India are plagued by an inward-looking nationalism that makes them lesser, not greater

  • The leaders of Britain’s two major parties both see little use for the European Union because they are stuck in the past
  • Likewise, India’s leaders reject diversity and broader trade to indulge Hindu nationalist fantasies about the past

TOP PICKS

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (right) and leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn prepare to lay wreaths during the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph in Whitehall in London on November 10. Photo: AP
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New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha hold hands at the third Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership summit in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 4. India later decided not to sign the pact. Photo: Reuters
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

What Brexit supporters can learn from India pulling out of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership

  • While RCEP has been rightly critiqued as a ‘stapler’ deal, it is an important assurance that countries remain committed to multi-country liberalisation
  • India’s withdrawal from the pact leaves the other 15 members in a quandary over whether to proceed or wait, and highlights the difficulty of concluding trade deals

TOP PICKS

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha hold hands at the third Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership summit in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 4. India later decided not to sign the pact. Photo: Reuters
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