Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
Malcolm Rifkind
Opinion

Opinion

Malcolm Rifkind

Beijing must respect High Court mask-law ruling in the interests of both Hong Kong and China

  • Any attempt to undermine Hong Kong’s judiciary would only be seen as a naked power grab by the mainland executive, inadvertently destroying the rule of law crucial to the city’s role as an international financial centre

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Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
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A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Tom Plate
Opinion

Opinion

Tom Plate

To end the Hong Kong protests, the Chinese leadership must blink first and offer to negotiate

  • In a protracted dispute, the stronger party must initiate negotiations so that the other side does not feel it has been forced to surrender
  • By directing the Hong Kong government to offer to start unconditional negotiations, China’s leaders can show the world a more nuanced face amid the trade war

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A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
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