Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
Malcolm Rifkind
Opinion

Opinion

Malcolm Rifkind

Beijing must respect High Court mask-law ruling in the interests of both Hong Kong and China

  • Any attempt to undermine Hong Kong’s judiciary would only be seen as a naked power grab by the mainland executive, inadvertently destroying the rule of law crucial to the city’s role as an international financial centre

Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
Protesters march in Causeway Bay on Halloween, on October 31, in defiance of the unpopular anti-mask law, which was hurriedly enacted under colonial-era emergency laws, a move the High Court has struck down as unconstitutional. Photo: May Tse
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Malcolm Rifkind

Malcolm Rifkind

Sir Malcolm Rifkind, KCMG QC, is a former UK foreign secretary.