A man walks past the Bank of Japan headquarters in Tokyo on January 29, 2016, the day Haruhiko Kuroda, the central bank governor, surprised investors by adopting a negative interest rate strategy to spur banks to lend in the face of a weakening economy. Photo:Bloomberg
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Advanced economies swallowing negative interest rates with glee must remember this is not a cure for depression

  • Negative interest rates have not encouraged spending and have fuelled inequality. Instead of relying on central bankers to tweak monetary policy, governments must initiate structural reforms. However, with a global slowdown in the offing, this is unlikely to happen

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A man walks past the Bank of Japan headquarters in Tokyo on January 29, 2016, the day Haruhiko Kuroda, the central bank governor, surprised investors by adopting a negative interest rate strategy to spur banks to lend in the face of a weakening economy. Photo:Bloomberg
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China and the United States contributed over 60 per cent of the US$7.5 trillion increase in global debt over the first half of 2019, according to the Institute of International Finance. Photo: EPA

China, US push global debt towards record US$255 trillion as trade war continues to impact global economy

  • The two nations contributed over 60 per cent of the US$7.5 trillion increase in global debt over the first half of 2019, said the Institute of International Finance
  • The overall debt load stood at over US$250 trillion at the end of June, equivalent to 320 per cent of global gross domestic product
Topic |   China economy

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China and the United States contributed over 60 per cent of the US$7.5 trillion increase in global debt over the first half of 2019, according to the Institute of International Finance. Photo: EPA
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