A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP
A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP
Anson Au
Opinion

Opinion

Anson Au

K-pop deaths show East Asia must end the stigma, and the solitude, that surrounds mental health

  • The deaths of Goo Hara and Sulli reveal signs of a deep mental health crisis in East Asia that isn’t talked about enough. To combat it requires more community outreach and specialised resources for reaching specific groups

A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP
A portrait of late K-pop star Goo Hara is seen at a memorial altar at a hospital in Seoul on November 25. Photo: STR/Dong-A Ilbo/AFP
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Anson Au

Anson Au

Anson Au is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Toronto. Award-winning author of over 30 academic research articles, he is an expert in professions, organisations, and social and economic networks, particularly in East Asia. He has previously held visiting appointments at the National Sun Yat-Sen University in Taiwan, Seoul National University and Yonsei University in South Korea, Harbin Institute of Technology in China, and University of Malaya in Malaysia.