Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: ReutersChinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: Reuters
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: Reuters
Kerry Craig
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Kerry Craig

US-China trade tension relief has helped nurture green shoots of global growth again, but can they be sustained?

  • Easing of the trade war tensions and some clarity on Brexit have lifted markets after a year of uncertainty. However, details on both are still to be hammered out, so investors should be cautious

Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: ReutersChinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: Reuters
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He gestures to the media as US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (left) and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin look on, before the two countries' trade negotiations in Washington on October 10. Both countries have reason to want tensions reduced, but even their recent “phase one” deal may not accomplish that for long. Photo: Reuters
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