People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters
People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Climate change, inequality and disruptive technology have brought toxic politics to a boil in 2019

  • Protests around the world and the rise of populist politics are rooted as much in climate change as in economic factors
  • Instead of lending to wealthy borrowers at negative interest rates, central banks could use quantitative easing to invest in green infrastructure

People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters
People hold placards during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago on December 10. Photo: Reuters
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Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng is a former central banker and financial regulator, currently distinguished fellow at the Asia Global Institute, University of Hong Kong. He writes widely on Asian perspectives on global issues, with columns in Project Syndicate, Asia News Network and Caijing/Caixin magazines. His latest book is “Shadow Banking in China”, co-authored with Ng Chow Soon, published by Wiley.