Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong
Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong
Brian YS Wong
Opinion

Opinion

Brian YS Wong

A New Year’s resolution for Hong Kong’s protesters, police and government: account for the collateral damage of your actions

  • The heavy cost paid by street cleaners, the homeless and workers in small businesses must not be ignored or forgotten
  • Both the protesters, who target Hong Kong’s prosperity, and the government, which is playing a waiting game, should realise their strategies hit the most vulnerable the hardest

Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong
Workers sweep up litter left behind on the Harcourt Road flyover in Admiralty on June 13, a day after anti-extradition bill protests took place outside the Legislative Council. Photo: Winson Wong
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Brian YS Wong

Brian YS Wong

Brian Wong is a DPhil in Politics candidate at Balliol College, Oxford, a Rhodes Scholar (Hong Kong 2020), and the founding editor-in-chief of the Oxford Political Review.