People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA
People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Malaysia’s Vision 2020 report card holds lessons for small nations tackling climate change, tech disruption and geopolitical challenges

  • Malaysia isn’t yet a high-income economy. Small nations may be helpless against big power politics, but every country can meet challenges with technology
  • For a vision to work, the political leadership needs everyone on board, and this means embracing diversity and shared goals

People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA
People gear up for a solar eclipse at the National Planetarium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on December 24, two days before the solar eclipse on December 26. Malaysia launched its Vision 2020 plan in 1991 – to lay out a vision 30 years into the future was breathtaking in its audacity. Photo: Bernama / DPA
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Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng is a former central banker and financial regulator, currently distinguished fellow at the Asia Global Institute, University of Hong Kong. He writes widely on Asian perspectives on global issues, with columns in Project Syndicate, Asia News Network and Caijing/Caixin magazines. His latest book is “Shadow Banking in China”, co-authored with Ng Chow Soon, published by Wiley.