Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE
Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE
Rupakjyoti Borah
Opinion

Opinion

Eye on Asia by Rupakjyoti Borah

Japan’s successful wooing of Chinese tourists may be too much of a good thing

  • Mainland Chinese make up by far the biggest group of tourists in Japan, boosting the economy but also bringing overcrowding and cultural discomfort
  • Such economic reliance also runs the risk of being weaponised in a political stand-off. Diversification is the wiser bet for Japan’s tourism policy

Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE
Tourists wearing masks visit the Sensoji temple in Tokyo, on January 30. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead despite novel coronavirus fears. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Rupakjyoti Borah

Rupakjyoti Borah

Dr Rupakjyoti Borah is a senior research fellow at the Japan Forum for Strategic Studies, Tokyo. His forthcoming book is The Strategic Relations between India, the United States and Japan in the Indo-Pacific: When Three is Not a Crowd. He has also authored two other books. He has been a visiting fellow at the University of Cambridge, the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Japan, and the Australian National University. Twitter @rupakj