A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters
A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters
Daniel Wagner
Opinion

Opinion

Daniel Wagner

Could a global coronavirus pandemic trigger an economic depression, forcing us to reckon with the downside of globalisation?

  • Since the last pandemic, globalisation has ensured a world more interconnected than ever, from supply chains to mass air travel. With the world on the cusp of a coronavirus pandemic, the drawbacks of a tightly linked global economy are becoming clear

A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters
A man crosses the road in the practically deserted central business district in Beijing on February 24. Photo: Reuters
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Daniel Wagner

Daniel Wagner

Daniel Wagner is senior investment officer for guarantees and syndications at the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing. He has three decades of experience assessing cross-border risk, is an authority on political risk insurance and analysis, and has worked for some of the world’s most respected and best-known companies, such as AIG, GE, the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the World Bank Group. He has published eight books as well as more than 700 articles on current affairs and risk management. He holds master’s degrees in International Relations from the University of Chicago and in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management.