Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP
Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP
Sylvia Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Sylvia Sheng

Asia must brace for short-term volatility as Covid-19 hits China and South Korea harder than expected

  • The surge in infections in South Korea is dampening economic activity even as China struggles to return to work, hurting demand for exports from the rest of Asia
  • Governments are rolling out accommodative measures but if Covid-19 continues to spread, expect uncertainty to remain in the near term

Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP
Soldiers in protective suits disinfect the area outside a Shincheonji church in Daegu, South Korea, on March 1, as Covid-19 cases outside China surge. Photo: AP
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Sylvia Sheng

Sylvia Sheng

Sylvia Sheng, vice president, is a global strategist on the multi-asset solutions team, responsible for communicating the group's economic and asset allocation strategy, based in Hong Kong. Prior to joining J.P. Morgan, she worked as a China and Asia economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. She has a PhD in economics from the University of Cambridge and an MPhil and BA in economics from the same university.