A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
Winston Mok
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Winston Mok

US-fuelled climate change, not China, is the greatest threat to the global economy and the world

  • While China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter, its per capita emissions are less than half the US’ and it is moving towards renewable energy
  • Meanwhile, the US accounts for twice China’s cumulative emissions in modern times but has pulled out of the Paris Agreement and remains committed to fossil fuels

A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
A member of the US Park Service’s revegetation crew hikes through fog among the trees blackened by the Sprague Creek wildfire in Glacier National Park, Montana, on September 17. The crew planted 585 whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the forest. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost 1.6 degrees Celsius since 1950, species like the whitebark pine are now facing increased threats of infections, insect infestations and wildfire. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
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