Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Lawrence J. Lau
Opinion

Opinion

Lawrence J. Lau

How the world can be better prepared for the next pandemic, and keep economic globalisation alive

  • Economic isolation is not the answer to a public health problem. Better ways must be found to manage supplies of essential goods, a public health response and cross-border travel during a pandemic

Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Empty shelves at a Walmart in Sulphur Springs, Texas, on March 18, after people stocked up on toilet paper and sanitiser amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
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