A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE
A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Coronavirus pandemic should prompt a global ban on short selling if hedge funds cannot self-regulate

  • The crisis raises the question of whether hedge fund activities should be reined in or more closely monitored. Making money out of market disorder may be permissible, but profiting from an abject global tragedy should not be

A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE
A trader wears a protective mask while working on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 20. Trillions have been wiped off financial markets in recent weeks. Photo: EPA-EFE
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.