Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP
Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP
Yu-Jie Chen
Opinion

Opinion

Yu-Jie Chen and Jerome A. Cohen

Beijing must come clean on arbitrary detention of Taiwanese or risk hurting its soft power ambitions

  • Since 2017, at least four Taiwanese have been arbitrarily detained in mainland China and isolated from family and lawyers because of a breakdown in cross-strait relations
  • International pressure is losing effectiveness as China grows in economic clout but Beijing’s intransigence will only damage its international standing.

Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP
Lee Ching-yu, wife of Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che jailed in China, answers questions during a press conference on March 28, 2019, as she arrives at Taoyuan International Airport. China banned her from visiting her husband in jail for three months, because of alleged improper behaviour. Photo: AP
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Yu-Jie Chen

Yu-Jie Chen

Yu-Jie Chen is a Taiwan lawyer who for the current academic year 2016-2017 is a visiting scholar at Columbia University’s Weatherhead East Asian Institute. She received her J.S.D. and LL.M. degrees from New York University School of Law. She also holds an LL.M. and LL.B. from National Chengchi University in Taiwan. Her research focuses on criminal justice and human rights developments in Taiwan and China.

Jerome A. Cohen

Jerome A. Cohen

Jerome A. Cohen is a law professor at New York University, faculty director of its US-Asia Law Institute and adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.