A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE
A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE
Balli Kaur Jaswal
Opinion

Opinion

Balli Kaur Jaswal

Rise in coronavirus cases brings to light Singaporeans’ racist attitudes towards foreign workers

  • The spread of the virus among its migrant workers living in cramped conditions has touched off a wave of blame and scapegoating in society, never mind that Singapore owes its success to this huge low-paid workforce providing many essential services

A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE
A foreign worker wearing a mask looks out from the North Coast Lodge foreign worker dormitory in Singapore on April 17. The government has been criticised for overlooking the living conditions of 1.3 million workers in essential services such as construction, transport and sanitation. Photo: EPA-EFE
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