A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE
Albert Cheng
Opinion

Opinion

Albert Cheng

As Hong Kong’s rule of law is eroded, voters have one last chance to turn the tide

  • A judge’s sentencing remarks in a Lennon Wall stabbing case have disturbing implications for Hong Kong’s rule of law
  • While the Court of Final Appeal has maintained its independence, it is not enough. In September, voters must help elect more pan-democrats to the legislature

A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of Lady Justice sits on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district. Hong Kong’s rule of law has been eroding since the handover, and now we might be looking at the end of it. Photo: EPA-EFE
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