Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg
Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg
Dani Rodrik
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Dani Rodrik

The post-pandemic world could be more sustainable and inclusive. The choice is ours

  • The talk everywhere is about decoupling and bringing supply chains home, but the retreat from hyper-globalisation need not mean trade wars. It is possible to envisage a more sensible, less intrusive model of economic globalisation

Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg
Employees work on a ventilator production line in an adapted hangar at an Airbus SE assembly plant in Broughton, Britain, on April 30. Industrial giants like Airbus are lending their factory floors to meet government orders. Photo: Bloomberg
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