A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP
A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP
Sylvia Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Sylvia Sheng

Amid coronavirus-driven volatility, three reasons the rennimbi has remained stable

  • The renminbi is backed by a Chinese economy that is recovering faster than others, an improving current account balance and a central bank not keen on devaluation
  • However, an escalation of US-China trade tensions could trigger a weakening of the currency

A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP
A woman walks past a bank window panel displaying the security markers on the latest 100 yuan notes in Beijing on February 18, 2019. Photo: AP
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