If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
SCMP Editorial
Opinion

Opinion

Editorial by SCMP Editorial

Battle to end trade in shark fins is not over

  • The seizure of 26 tonnes of the so-called delicacy by Hong Kong customs officials shows that where there is demand there will be supply

If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
If more diners can be persuaded to say no to shark fin, they can help make the supply chain less profitable which, hopefully, can ultimately halt the slaughter. The fins pictured are from a shark finning camp in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
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