Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters
Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters
Daniel Wagner
Opinion

Opinion

Daniel Wagner

Coronavirus pandemic is hastening the death of the globalised order and the rise of a ‘me first’ world

  • Control of critical resources will provide new sources of power for the short list of countries that possess them
  • The accelerated shift to digital and gig economies will highlight the gap between those who can adapt and those who cannot

Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters
Soybeans are harvested from a field in Roachdale, Indiana, in November 8, 2019. Countries that dominate trade in key resources, such as iron ore, oil and soybeans, could stand to benefit handsomely in a world turning away from globalisation. Photo: Reuters
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