Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua
Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua
Jin Liqun
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Jin Liqun

As we emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, the world must invest in digital infrastructure as well as health care

  • The shift to online activities due to the pandemic has only amplified the digital divide
  • The gap between the haves and the have-nots will only increase unless the developing world is supported in boosting digital infrastructure

Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua
Ce Geng (left) prepares to take an online class as her mother looks on in Alxa Left Banner, in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on April 1. The nine-year-old’s parents drive her around their ranch to look for better Wi-fi when the weather is bad so she can attend classes online after schools shut due to Covid-19. Photo: Xinhua
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