An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song
An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song
David Zweig
Opinion

Opinion

David Zweig

What lies behind Beijing’s imposition of a national security law in Hong Kong? Fear, not arrogance

  • China’s leaders are facing challenges on multiple fronts – from the economy to global criticism of their handling of Covid-19
  • Beijing believes that another summer of protests in Hong Kong and what it perceives as hostile US activities in the city cannot be tolerated

An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song
An armed policeman stands in front of the Tiananmen Rostrum in Beijing on May 22, the first day of the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress, China’s top legislative body. The central government submitted a resolution to the NPC to enable its standing committee to pass a new national security law tailor-made for Hong Kong. Photo: Simon Song
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