A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP
A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP
Charles Dunst
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Charles Dunst

How the coronavirus pandemic will push developing countries to delink their economies from China

  • Many developing countries have adopted an export-oriented economic model that hinges on demand from China
  • As China’s imports from these countries decline due to Covid-19, they may shift away from export reliance and from the influence of the Communist Party

A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP
A vendor sells durian at a street stall in Bangkok on May 28. Thai fruit, including durian, have become popular among Chinese consumers, but exports have plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: AFP
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Charles Dunst

Charles Dunst

Charles Dunst is an associate at LSE IDEAS, the London School of Economics' foreign policy think tank, and a journalist who has written for The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and Foreign Policy, among other publications. He was previously based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. (@CharlesDunst)