People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang
People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang
Song Xiaozhuang
Opinion

Opinion

Song Xiaozhuang

Why a national security law does not threaten Hong Kong’s autonomy or violate international agreements

  • Hong Kong has more autonomy than US states and strong protections for human rights. The proposed national security law is restricted to four crimes
  • It is not the first regulation governing the relationship between Hong Kong and China to be listed in Annex III of the Basic Law

People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang
People attend a flag-raising ceremony at Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong on October 1, 2012. Twenty-three years after the handover of sovereignty from Britain to China, Hong Kong’s legislature has not enacted a national security law as required under Article 23 of the Basic Law. Photo: Sam Tsang
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