Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP
Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicholas Spiro

For Hong Kong’s property market, the national security law is just one more uncertainty in an already uncertain time

  • The sector, first hit in 2018 when Beijing’s capital controls led to a decline in leasing demand, is struggling under the impact of a trade war and Covid-19
  • Despite the political tensions, most investors still see Hong Kong as a vital offshore funding platform for Chinese companies

Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP
Protesters gather at a rally in a shopping mall in Hong Kong on June 1 against China’s national security legislation for the city. Photo: AP
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.