Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP
Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP
Edward Tse
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Edward Tse and Thomas W. Pauken II

Even with talk of a new Cold War, Chinese companies should seek stronger economic ties in the US

  • Despite the harsh rhetoric between Washington and Beijing, there are opportunities for bilateral economic cooperation at the local level
  • Chinese companies can boost bilateral relations by helping communities in the rust belt, for example

Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP
Fuyao, a Chinese automotive glass producer, operates a plant in Ohio that was the subject of the documentary American Factory. Photo: AP
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Edward Tse

Edward Tse

Edward Tse is founder and CEO of Gao Feng Advisory Company, a strategy consultancy with roots in China assisting clients on global business and management issues. He previously headed Greater China operations for two major international management consulting firms for over 20 years, and is the author of The China Strategy and China’s Disruptors.

Thomas W. Pauken II

Thomas W. Pauken II

Thomas W. Pauken II is a commentator on Asia-Pacific affairs and geopolitical consultant based in Beijing, China. He is the author of the book, US vs China: From Trade War to Reciprocal Deal.